Kannon-sama Pilgrimage: Jochi-ji and Tokei-ji

At the end of the Daibutsu-Kuzuharaoka hiking trail, in Kita-Kamakura, sits Jochi-ji, temple number 31 of the Kamakura Thirty-Three Kannon Pilgrimage. Not far down the road is Tokei-ji, temple number 32.

In Japan, Thirty-Three Kannon pilgrimages are fairly common. According to Kamakura City’s webpage on its Kannon-sama pilgrimage, the first Thirty-Three Kannon pilgrimage — the Saigoku Sanju-San Sho — was established in the 12th century in the Kansai area, followed by the Bando Sanju-San Sho pilgrimage in the Kanto area in the 13th century. (NB – other sources suggest these pilgrimage routes were established many centuries earlier.) From there, Thirty-Three Kannon pilgrimages took off, spreading around the country.

Why 33? Religious texts say that there are 33 manifestations of Kannon, so apparently, that’s why there are usually (but not always!) 33 stops on Japan’s Kannon pilgrimages.

The Kamakura pilgrimage doesn’t include all 33 manifestations, however — it’s just 33 important temples dedicated to Kannon-sama. I’m working my way around Kamakura, collecting stamps for the pilgrimage. This video is the second in what I hope will be a series to introduce the pilgrimage — as well as the city in general — to those outside of Kamakura.

Kamakura Bungakukan Rose Festival

Spring in Kamakura means flowers of all sorts: cherry, peach, dogwood, irises, hydrangea — something always seems to be in bloom. Roses, too, make an appearance in neighbourhood gardens, and bloom in profusion at the Kamakura Bungakukan (Museum of Literature) during its Bara Matsuri (Rose Festival).

The museum itself is stunning — the building is an old Western-style villa, but suffers from a lack of signage in foreign languages, making it somewhat inaccessible for the average visitor from abroad. The gardens, however, can be enjoyed by all.

From early May until early June (this year, the festival runs until June 11), the garden at the foot of the Bungakukan’s extensive lawn is a riot of colour, and the air is lightly perfumed. It’s the perfect place to take a break from all the temple and shrine visiting that goes on during a visit to Kamakura.

 

 

Hydrangea Train, Kamakura

In Kamakura, June means hydrangeas. Thousands of them. And the tourists just eat it up.

One of the most popular spots to take photos is Goryo Jinja, because the always-photogenic Enoden Line train rattles by as it exits the tunnel between Gokuraku-ji and Saka-no-shita.